Some Thoughts on Making an Impact

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Ever since I was a little kid, I wanted to be a superhero, just like the ones I saw on TV. I idolized these people who had unique stories. Some survived tragedies, some were given extraordinary gifts, and some were ordinary people who decided to do something extraordinary. Through self-sacrifice, they worked to save others (and sometimes defeat “the bad guy”).

As I grew older, the people I idolized the most were my teachers. These were people that made my time in school a great experience. Yes, they did teach me things, but more importantly they opened my mind to a world of previously undiscovered ideas. They made me smarter, wiser, and a better human being. Not only did they do this for me, but they spent their careers doing this for others too.

So, not coincidentally, I became an educator too. I wanted to make as large of a social impact as I could, so I decided to teach high school English. I figured that I’d work in high school since it’s the vital strange right before adulthood. Also, since everyone needs the English skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening (let’s not forget critical thinking), I would be helping everyone develop the essential skills they need in whichever career path they chose. Being a high school English teacher seemed to be the most practical and effective way to make a positive difference in the world.

Now, 9 years later, I don’t regret that decision at all. I’ve built a career that I’m proud to have. I’ve seen my students struggle and grow throughout the school year. I’ve watched them grow and mature. I’ve watched them start their adult lives. I’ve heard from many former students about the wonderful things they’ve moved on to after high school. That makes it worth it.I may not have made millions of dollars in this career, but the impact I make with people is what I’m in it for.

Roderick Conwi is the Executive Editor at Nourishment Notes. He is also the author of The Procrastinator's Quick Guide To Getting It Done. To get powerful insights that enhance your day, join his free newsletter.

What You Need to Know about Kindess

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Kindness is something that the world could always use a little more of. People often confuse being kind with being nice, but it’s different. Being nice is being pleasant with other people, no matter how obnoxious or ignorant they are. Being kind is acting in a way that you are understanding, acting on behalf of someone else, or committing a selfless act for the greater good.

Kindness is an awesome thing. We are all capable of it, especially you and me. Even though it can cost money to do kind things, it doesn’t cost a cent to be kind. The kindness that comes from your heart is ever-flowing; we can never run out of it. At times, you may feel drained or burnt out, and that’s okay. When that happens, give yourself some time to recharge and then you’ll be ready to give again.

Being kind can be hard. You can be surrounded by people who are hard to be kind to, but being unkind to them diminishes your humanity. By being unkind, you do the world nor yourself any favors. By being a kind person in situations where it’s easier to be unkind, you are become a bigger person.

You may have been taught that kindness is weak or that being kind shows people that you’re a push-over. People who think that way just don’t understand. Those who truly understand kindness know that being kind requires maturity, self-discipline, emotional intelligence, and courage.

No acts of kindness are ever random. That’s the wonderful thing about it. They don’t happen by accident. Every act of kindness is intentional and happened for a reason.

The thing about kindness that people tend to misunderstand is that it takes practice. The more you do it, the better you get at it. It may be hard at first, but with time, practice, and patience, you’ll be a kinder person, and the world will be a better place because of that.

Roderick Conwi is the Executive Editor at Nourishment Notes. He is also the author of The Procrastinator's Quick Guide To Getting It Done. To get powerful insights that enhance your day, join his free newsletter.

It’s Okay to Feel Scared, Angry, and Even Hopeful (just not Apathetic)

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With Sunday’s shooting in Las Vegas, NV, it’s definitely normal to have a whole heap of emotions running through you.

It was a tragic event where people were murdered and many more were injured. For many, their lives were changed forever in an instant. Many of us are grieving and trying to find a sense of normality in our own way.

If you’re scared, I want you to know that it’s okay to feel scared. The people who were attacked were going to a concert. Concerts in Las Vegas aren’t out of the ordinary, yet what happened was out of a nightmare. Many people viciously died and many more were hurt. It’s okay to feel less secure than you did before. With the rising frequency of mass shootings in the United States, it is perfectly normal to feel some degree of fear trying to lead a normal life.

It’s also okay to be angry. You can be mad at the shooter, at politicians about the ever-lasting gun control debate, and even at the world as a whole. How you feel is how people tend to feel when injustice happens.

During this time, if you feel a little bit of hope, that’s okay too. It’s normal for people to try to look at the bright side of tragic situations. It may be your way of coping with the stress of the aftermath of the event. Just because you’re being hopeful doesn’t automatically make you an insensitive person; it may mean that you’re trying to be a guiding light for others (and yourself).

It’s okay to feel all these different emotions, but I must tell you, it’s not okay to be apathetic. Being apathetic means that you don’t care or don’t care enough. Being apathetic means that you’ve been beaten down so much that don’t even want to think about trying. It means that you’re numb to the pain of the world and have lost your humanity. Our capacity to care for each other is what will help us rise above this calamity.

Roderick Conwi is a professional development coach and writes at Nourishment Notes about lifestyle development. He is also the author of The Procrastinator's Quick Guide To Getting It Done. To get powerful insights that enhance your day, join his free newsletter.

On Forgiveness

Photo Credit: Lucian Milas / CC0 1.0
Forgiveness is one of those hard topics to talk about. It’s one of those things that we say we should do, but is very hard to do. It means that we have to acknowledge our faults. It requires that we have to be vulnerable. At least one person has to admit that s/he was wrong.

Forgiveness usually exists in one of these forms: forgiving others, forgiving oneself, or asking for forgiveness.

Forgiving Others

Forgiving others may be the easiest of all since you get to admit that someone else is at fault, s/he is the one asking for forgiveness, and you’re the one who gets to forgive.

About a year ago, an old classmate of mine reached out to me on Facebook and apologized for being mean to me when we were kids. She was being vulnerable and I could tell she was being authentic. I told her that I forgave her and that it wasn’t something that scarred me. I knew we were kids and a lot of people, especially me, do dumb things because we don’t know any better. Luckily, it was something I was able to let go sometime in my youth.

Sometimes it’s better to forgive someone even if no one asked for forgiveness at all. If you wait for an apology, you may never get it. If you’re able to let go of the pain, then you’ll live your life a whole lot lighter and you’ll get to be the bigger person.

Years ago, I used to have a supervisor who didn’t have a lot of integrity. A lot of people, including myself, felt that were were being treated unfairly. Like most sane people, I left. She never said goodbye, wished me well, or apologized for being a crappy boss. I wouldn’t expect it anyway; it’s out of her character. Although I would never work with her again, I have put my experienced with her behind me. Holding onto any type of bitterness, however small, would be toxic.

Forgiving Yourself

Forgiving yourself requires you to look honestly at yourself and your past, acknowledge that you did something wrong, and confront that. It’s something that could take years to accomplish.

I know I’m not a perfect person, but I try to be as close to it as possible. I’ve said stupid or hurtful things. I’ve let people down. I’ve beat myself up about things that’ve already happened. I can’t do anything to change the past, but I can learn to forgive myself.

Asking for Forgiveness

Asking for forgiveness is probably one of the hardest things in the world to do. This is where you really are vulnerable and eat humble pie. This is where you admit that you’re at fault, and it’s entirely up to someone else to forgive you. They could forgive you, or not. It’s their choice. Either way, the outcome is out of your hands.

About a year ago, I apologized to a friend of mine that I used to be close with. I didn’t keep contact for about 8 years or so. I was a bad friend. Out of grace, she came back into my life and I told her that I was sorry for not being there for her all these years. Fortunately, she understood that our lives got busy and we’re in a better place now.

Last Thoughts

There are times when it’s easier to forgive than others, but I’m a big believer in forgiving, but not forgetting. If someone wronged me or I wronged someone, it’s a life lesson to be learned. I’m not going to make the mistake again. If someone wronged me, I may trust them again, but within reasonable limits. If someone flaked out on me and apologized, I’d forgive them, but not rely on their punctuality in the future.

Being able to forgive is something that we are blessed to be. Forgiveness makes the world a kinder, more compassionate place.

Roderick Conwi is a professional development coach and writes at Nourishment Notes about lifestyle development. He is also the author of The Procrastinator's Quick Guide To Getting It Done. To get powerful insights that enhance your day, join his free newsletter.

REMINDER: Take Care of Thyself

Photo Credit: Lukas North / CC0 1.0
“Take care of yourself.”

That’s simple advice that people usually say to others, but sometimes can be hard to follow. It’s easy to succumb to the pressures of contemporary life, especially if you’re balancing tons of different responsibilities. I must say, the more hectic life feels, the more important it is to take some time to practice self-care.

My life is usually pretty busy. Anyone who knows me knows that I hate being busy. I almost always have something to do. I hate it. I feel like I can’t stop and smell the roses or take my time to enjoy whatever I’m presently doing. I feel like I can’t entirely relax because in the back of my mind, there’s something that will need to be done. Sometimes I’m so busy with family, relatives, friends, work, or something else, taking care of myself gets put on the back burner. I’m a big believer that it’s fine to sometimes put others ahead of yourself, but sometimes putting yourself first is necessary. If you’re not 100%, then you’re not able to truly help other people. It’s something that I’m working on and getting better at.

It’s about taking care of yourself physically, mentally, and emotionally.  It’s about being proud of who you are. It’s about keeping yourself satisfied with your life. It’s about being happy living the life you want. It’s about building and maintaining authentic connections with the people you love.

Life is a complex marathon. In order to make it to the end, you’re going to have to take care of yourself along the way.

Roderick Conwi is a professional development coach and writes at Nourishment Notes about lifestyle development. He is also the author of The Procrastinator's Quick Guide To Getting It Done. To get powerful insights that enhance your day, join his free newsletter.

It's Okay If You Don't Know What To Do with the Rest of Your Life

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Lately, I've talked with many friends who are going through a "what should I do with my life" existential crisis. I saw the anxiety in them as they talked to me about getting older, and not knowing what they should be doing with the rest of their life.

As we grow up, we're socialized in our society to think that the perfect progression of life is to go to school, get a job, buy a house, and have a family (in that particular order). We're taught that we're to start our career as soon as we finish school, and that's what we do to occupy our time until retirement.

While in school, before we "start our careers," we're asked to think about and decide about what we want to do when we grow up. We're conditioned to think that we need to pick that "one thing" that we're going to do with the rest of our lives.

I like to think of it this way: the whole idea of knowing the one thing you're going to do with the rest of your life is a fallacy. That belief is an unrealistic expectation and sets up people for a lot of heartache. Personally, I believe that we should be able to decide what we want to do with our lives, and change our minds however we see fit.

Life is fluid and unpredictable. It works out in so many ways that's hard for us to predict with 100% accuracy. Out of all the people I know in the world, I only know one person who knew what she wanted to do with her career young, went to school for it, and has her amazing career. Even her life has had a few curve balls; she wasn't able to plan or foresee everything.

Everyone else I know has had a non-linear career path. Even I changed my career path, twice. We bounced from position to position for different reasons. Some people changed jobs, and some changed entire career paths.

The ones who switched careers decided to make a change for the better. They either wanted a change because ether wanted to be in a career path that gave them more satisfaction, or the pay better supports the lifestyle they want to have. At some point in their lives, they changed their minds about their career, and that's perfectly fine.

Life is too short to be in a career that doesn't give you satisfaction. It's okay to change your mind about your career path; it's your life. As you get older, you become more experienced, mature, and your perspective on life may change, especially your career.

Roderick Conwi is a professional development coach and writes at Nourishment Notes about lifestyle development. He is also the author of The Procrastinator's Quick Guide To Getting It Done. To get powerful insights that enhance your day, join his free newsletter.

Doing Things Right & Doing the Right Things

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Ok, we're going to have to discuss the difference between doing the right things and doing things right.

In general, people tend to talk about the importance of doing things right. I get it. If you're going to do something, you better be sure to do it right. If you don't do something right, the consequences will get you in the long run.

It's definitely important to do something right. It's a habit that gets people promoted and propels people toward success.

Doing things right is just one factor; you need to also do the right things. If you're going to get promoted, you'll have to prioritize and make good decisions of how you're going to spend your time and energy. It's important to pick the right things to do, and do them well.

Roderick Conwi is a professional development coach and writes at Nourishment Notes about lifestyle development. He is also the author of The Procrastinator's Quick Guide To Getting It Done. To get powerful insights that enhance your day, join his free newsletter.

"Someday" Isn't a Day of the Week

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Here's one piece of good advice I've gained from my many years of experience from living on this Earth: if you need to get something done, do it today. Better yet, if you can, start doing it now.

If it's something that you SHOULD be doing and that you COULD be doing, then right now, in the present, is the best time to start moving.

You could procrastinate and wait until tomorrow to get it started. I get it. You're busy. You've had a long day. You have responsibilities and not all the time in the world. But if you start going down that route, you'll never start and definitely never get it done.


Here are some tips to get started:
1. Write down a specific plan, preferably broken down in stages
2. Make a deadline for yourself
3. Tell someone your plan/goal to help keep you accountable

Today is when it's going to get started; not someday. Someday is an abyss where dreams get lost. "Someday" will never be today.

It's the day that matters most because it's the day you have an opportunity to do something. Today is the day that turns future dreams into present reality. It's the day you get up and get started.

Roderick Conwi is a professional development coach and writes at Nourishment Notes about lifestyle development. He is also the author of The Procrastinator's Quick Guide To Getting It Done. To get powerful insights that enhance your day, join his free newsletter.

One Great Way to Be a Great Parent

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A couple years ago, a friend of mine asked me for some advice on how to be a good parent.  At that time, she was pregnant with her first child, and I already had two young kids of my own. Since I had a couple years of experience ahead of her, it was understandable that she looked to me for some source of parental wisdom.

The first and only thing that I could think of telling her was "be a good person." It's about pushing yourself daily to be the best version of yourself. Being a good person is fundamentally important in being a great parent.

Parents are the main role models in their kids' lives. Kids learn so much from their parents. They play a key role into their socialization and how they perceive themselves and interact with the rest of society.

Who you are affects everything about you. It affects your thoughts, decisions, and actions. Being a good person causes you to think good thoughts and make smart decisions.Those are the kind of things you'll want to happen when you're a parent.

As a parent, you want to teach your kids how to be mentally and emotionally healthy. You want to teach them how to properly act around other people, or in the face of adversity. You want to teach them how to act with compassion and to live with love. The best way to teach them that is to show them that yourself.

You may not always make the best decisions (hindsight is 20/20), but the better the person you push yourself to be, the better decisions you make. You'll make the best decisions you can for your kids, and in turn, slowly teach them how to make good decisions themselves.

As a parent, it's natural for you to want the best for your kids. You must exemplify the type of person you want your kids to be.

Roderick Conwi is a professional development coach and writes at Nourishment Notes about lifestyle development. He is also the author of The Procrastinator's Quick Guide To Getting It Done. To get powerful insights that enhance your day, join his free newsletter.

Why You Need to Be One Step Ahead of Your Competition

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“The successful person has the habit of doing the things that failures don’t like to do. The successful person doesn’t like doing them either, but his dislike is subordinated to the strength of his purpose.”
- E.M. Gray

I’m going to tell you one secret to success: be one step ahead of your competition. That means you need to be willing to work harder than everyone else. That means you should be thinking smarter than everyone else. It means that you must be more disciplined and determined than everyone else.

Being one step ahead of everyone else gives you a competitive advantage. You’re the first to try out things, whether it’s a new piece of technology or a new strategy.

Being ahead also gives you a time advantage because you have more time to do your task well, or if you mess up, you have more time to recover. In the competitive world, having more time is a competitive advantage over having less.

In any competition, being one or more steps ahead of your opponents is an advantage. If you put in more effort than your competition, you’ll be ahead. If you’re willing to do what everyone else isn’t, that’s your competitive edge. If you put in more time (and use that time wisely), then you’ll have the advantage over the competition. Like I discussed earlier, if you have more time than everyone else, they’re at a disadvantage. If you work smarter than your opponents, then your strategy will be ahead of the rest.

Not only will being ahead of your competition gives you an advantage, it propels you closer towards success.

Roderick Conwi is a professional development coach and writes at Nourishment Notes about lifestyle development. He is also the author of The Procrastinator's Quick Guide To Getting It Done. To get powerful insights that enhance your day, join his free newsletter.

Balance is a Key to Success in Life

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Balance is a key to life. Too much or too little of something isn’t good for you. Take food for example. If you consistently have too much food, it’ll lead towards obesity and all the health problems that go with it. If you constantly have too little food, you’ll be deprived of essential nutrients that your body needs to function. You need to eat just enough to avoid starvation, but not too much to avoid overeating.

Balance applies in everything else in life. You want to balance your work and home responsibilities. You balance your time for your family, friends, and yourself. You balance your bank accounts so that you have enough to maintain your lifestyle. Balance is very important.

Finding balance is hard. It’s not something you can physically look for or buy. It is something that you must create for yourself. You must actively put in the effort to make wise decisions to keep the various factors in your life balanced. People may help you create this, but it’s ultimately up to you to create it. When you create balance, you lead a balanced lifestyle for yourself.

Roderick Conwi is a professional development coach and writes at Nourishment Notes about lifestyle development. He is also the author of The Procrastinator's Quick Guide To Getting It Done. To get powerful insights that enhance your day, join his free newsletter.

This is the Way Through Fear and Doubt

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"Believe you can and you’re halfway there." —Theodore Roosevelt

You are more powerful than you think. If you believe that you can’t do something, you probably can’t. By thinking that you can’t, you mentally block yourself from being able to do so. It’s a self-fulfilling prophecy. On the flip side, if you believe you can, you probably can (or you have a higher possibility of being successful than thinking that you can’t).

Fear gets in the way. Being afraid of failing can be intimidating. You might fear feeling humiliated for trying new or unusual.

Doubt gets in the way. Doubt tells you that “you can’t.” It whispers in your ear that “it’s too hard” or “it’s not for me.” Doubt kills your dreams way before you even get to start working towards them.

Fear and doubt can be debilitating, but they’re not as powerful as believing in yourself. Being able to cultivate your own courage is what gets you through the fear and doubt each time they get in the way.

Believing in yourself is the first big step in reaching your goals. By doing so, you give yourself permission to aim high and go for your goals. To many, taking the first step is the hardest part, but after the first step, you start to build forward momentum that takes you on the path towards the life you’ve been dreaming daringly of.

Roderick Conwi is a professional development coach and writes at Nourishment Notes about lifestyle development. He is also the author of The Procrastinator's Quick Guide To Getting It Done. To get powerful insights that enhance your day, join his free newsletter.

Don't Hold Back; You Can Do It!

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"Don't let what you cannot do interfere with what you can do."
-John R. Wooden

You can do a lot of things. Sure, there are a lot of things that you can't do (yet), but there are a lot of thing that you have done, and still can do.

Don't be bogged down with thoughts or beliefs of what you think you can't do. Even those can change with practice, patience, and persistence.

Use what you're good at to your advantage. Not everyone is good at the same thing you are. Those skills are your strength. They are what help you get ahead in life.

Definitely do what you love. Don't hold back. If you're interested or passionate about something, you can't help but be good at it.

If you're an expert in a specific topic (like health, finance, or playing the acoustic guitar), know that makes you unique. Not everyone has expertise in the same field as you, so use it to your advantage. Use it to help others and also advance your life.

There is so much that you can do. You have the potential. Don't let negative thoughts such as fear or self-doubt get in the way. You can do it.

Roderick Conwi is a professional development coach and writes at Nourishment Notes about lifestyle development. He is also the author of The Procrastinator's Quick Guide To Getting It Done. To get powerful insights that enhance your day, join his free newsletter.

You are Multi-Talented, Deep, and Multi-Dimensional

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You are more than one thing. You're more than just a man, woman, father, mother, stay-at-home parent, cashier, custodian, or any other job. You're much more than that. Don't let anyone, especially yourself, fall into that trap.

Falling in would be an offense to your self-worth.

A couple of days ago, I made the mistake of saying, "I'm just a teacher." It was a slip of the tongue and a slip of the mind. I know I am much more than that. I am also a husband, father, author, and artist, but in that moment, I slipped into that trap.

This trap of thinking that we are only one thing isn't something we can afford to keep falling into. We have many talents. Even if you're really good at one thing, we are also good at other things, even if it's not everything. Your character grows deeper as you experience more and more of life. You are a complex human being, and it's something you (and I) should always remember.

Roderick Conwi is a professional development coach and writes at Nourishment Notes about lifestyle development. He is also the author of The Procrastinator's Quick Guide To Getting It Done. To get powerful insights that enhance your day, join his free newsletter.

Quiet is Good for the Soul

Photo Credit: Zak Suhar / CC0 1.0 
Quietness is sometimes good for you.  It helps you think and clear your head. It's a retreat away from the distractions of everyday life.

In our busy society, it's easy to think of quietness as something boring, but it's unhealthy to not take mental and physical breaks. Self-care is important. It's necessary to take a break for yourself and recharge.

One of my favorite ways is spending time out in nature. Even if it's just for a little bit, it's nice to have the time and space to reflect away from my daily habit.

On other days, I also like to sit quietly drinking a cup of coffee in the morning as I mentally wake up, reflect, and plan out my day.

There are many ways to give yourself some quiet time. You can be as creative as you want. A friend of mine likes to drive her daily commute with the radio turned off to give herself some quiet reflection time.

So if you can, challenge yourself to give yourself a little more quiet time today, tomorrow, this week, next week, and so on.

Roderick Conwi is a professional development coach and writes at Nourishment Notes about lifestyle development. He is also the author of The Procrastinator's Quick Guide To Getting It Done. To get powerful insights that enhance your day, join his free newsletter.

Hard Work is Great, but You Also Need To Make Good Decisions

Photo Credit: Kyle Bianchi // free under CC0 1.0
First of all, I want to say that hard work is good. I don't want to undermine it. It's definitely something everyone needs in order to achieve success. Working hard towards what you want is infinitely a better strategy than just wishing for it. Being able to put in the time and practice are work habits that everyone needs to be successful, no matter what field they're in.

As great as hard work is, it can only take you so far. This is where making good decisions makes all the difference. You need to be able to work hard doing the right things instead of working hard doing the wrong things. Figuring out the difference between the two is hard. It takes time and experience. You need to develop decision making skills crafted from conscious practice, taking calculated risks, and learning from trial and errors.

Think of it this way: working hard is an entry-level minimum wage job is a good thing, but it can only get you so far. You'll get raises and promotions, but in the long run, you probably won't earn as much as someone who started off in another field with a higher salary or in the same field, but higher on the corporate ladder.

You need to make good decisions that keep you away from dead-end jobs and ones that give you multiple opportunities for growth over an extended period of time. You need to make proactive decisions where you take the initiative, especially in doing the work that no one else wants to do or can't do.

Also, making good decisions aren't enough; you still need hard work. You just can't choose to go to medical school in order to become a medical doctor, you also need to apply, study, pass classes, exams, complete your residency, and much more. Making good decisions points you in the right direction, and hard work gets you there.

Roderick Conwi is a professional development coach and writes at Nourishment Notes about lifestyle development. He is also the author of The Procrastinator's Quick Guide To Getting It Done. To get powerful insights that enhance your day, join his free newsletter.

Don't Let Life Intimidate You. Take the First Step.

Photo Credit: Melissa Maples // free under CC0 1.0
Life can be very intimidating. We're all used to the life we know and everything outside our bubble naturally is outside our comfort zone. To many, the next stage of life is an unknown jungle, where sometimes the very fear of leaving our comfort zone puts us in a form of paralysis. Most of us can get over this paralysis, some of us get stuck there for a while, and unfortunately, some of us stay there for the rest of our lives.

This is why we have dreams and goals. We have wild dreams that fulfill our hearts and souls. Our dreams give us hope for a better life ahead and remind us not to stay complacent. Our goals guide us towards our dreams. Our goals are more specific, have deadlines, and keep us on track.

It all starts with a start; you have to take a step forward to begin your journey towards your dreams. Being complacent or staying still for too long doesn't serve you. It's okay to pause and reflect, but don't get stuck in that spot for too long. Forward momentum is key, but you'll never get momentum if you never start.

Taking that first step may be intimidating, but it's necessary. If you never start, you never finish. Having self-confidence helps, but not necessary. You'll be able to build it through the process, especially through the challenges. The trials and tribulations are learning experiences and opportunities for growth.

If you're not satisfied with the life you live because you're not living your dream life, I highly suggest you do something about it. The next steps may be uncertain. It may take time.


The process may be frustrating. But in the end, it'll be all worth it. Start now.

Roderick Conwi is a professional development coach and writes at Nourishment Notes about lifestyle development. He is also the author of The Procrastinator's Quick Guide To Getting It Done. To get powerful insights that enhance your day, join his free newsletter.

You Have Permission To Be Your Unapologetically-Weird Self

Photo Credit: Marcus Cederberg / CC0 1.0
We're all a little weird. There is no true definition of "normal." Normal is just a social construct that we've created in order to have society comply to a general set of behaviors. We all deviate in some form or fashion from what we consider "normal."

Don't get me wrong, there is value to having some kind of "normal." What we consider normal defines our social norms, which are a sort of social rules that we abide by. Social norms define what behaviors are socially acceptable and unacceptable in specific social situations. They help keep our society functioning, well, normally.

The important thing to know is that what makes you weird makes you unique, and you should embrace that. That is what makes you special. That is exactly what makes you an individual. Embrace all the wonderful and quirky things that make you, you.

Take a look inside and embrace who you are. I am an optimistic person with a passion for social justice. I make clever, yet sarcastic jokes. I'm a writer fascinated by almost every topic (productivity, entrepreneurship, life hacks, technology, art, poetry, and more).

I know this is who I am right now. I accept it. It may change later, and that's okay. But for now, I embrace and love who I am. Through my daily journeys, I both defined and discovered myself. I am not perfect, but it can be argued that I am perfect just the way that I am.

So, I say to you, my friend, be your unapologetically weird self. No one else can be you except you, and because of that, you are special. The world needs you to be you.

Roderick Conwi is a professional development coach and writes at Nourishment Notes about lifestyle development. He is also the author of The Procrastinator's Quick Guide To Getting It Done. To get powerful insights that enhance your day, join his free newsletter.

Why Loving Others is How I Practice My Faith

Photo Credit: Ryan McQueen // free under CC0 1.0 
"Whoever does not love does not know God, because God is love."
1 John 4:8 NIV

God is love. By loving other people, I am practicing my faith. That is what I believe. It's simple, yet very complex.

Love isn't just the romantic type that you see in movies; it exists in many forms. It exists in I treat other people. Taking care of my family is one way that I show love. Spending quality time with my friends and loved ones is another. Holding the door open for a stranger is a simple, yet meaningful one. Even something as simple as being present and listening to someone who needs/wants someone to talk to is one way I've shown people love.

It's not always easy to be a loving person. Most of the time it is, but for me, sometimes it's pretty hard. And when it is hard, it's really hard. Sometimes people are ignorant and hateful. Sometimes their words, their posts, or little comments are hurtful. It takes me a lot of self-discipline not to react in the same manner. No matter how other people act, I always try to react with love, understanding, common sense. Sometimes I do a good job at it. Sometimes I don't flop horribly. Sometimes I consider not reacting with hate a win. No matter how well I do at loving other people, I truly try.

As important as it is to love one another, it's also important to love ourselves (not in an arrogant or conceited way). We are all God's children who are deserving of love and it would be contradictory to love other people, but not ourselves. It's perfectly fine to practice self-care. Within reason, I try to take some time for myself each day. Reflecting for a few minutes while drinking my morning cup of coffee is one of my favorite ways. I eat as healthy as I can. I intentionally choose to incorporate as many fresh foods into my diet. I need to ensure that I am physically, mentally, and emotionally okay to take care of my family and also help take care of others.

By loving others, and myself, I am doing God's work. This is how I choose to practice my faith.

Roderick Conwi is a professional development coach and writes at NourishmentNotes.com about lifestyle development. He is also the author of The Procrastinator's Quick Guide To Getting It Done. To get powerful insights that enhance your day, join his free newsletter.

You Have the Opportunity To Change Your Life Right Now

Photo Credit: Gabriel Lupu / CC0 1.0

“I can’t change the direction of the wind, but I can adjust my sails to always reach my destination.” —Jimmy Dean

We all have dreams, especially when we were little kids. Dreams are what motivates us in the morning, keeps us pushing ourselves in school, and grinding in the workplace. Having dreams help give us a sense of purpose.

If you’re life isn’t where you want it to be, there is good news for you: you can do something about it. In fact, you can always do something about it. There isn’t a law that says you have to be stuck in a rut. You always have the opportunity to do something different to change your life’s direction.

You can choose to be different. You can push yourself to be stronger, wiser, and smarter. Doing what you’ve always done will keep you at the same place you’re at, so in order to improve your life, you will have to improve your habits. You will have to think more positively. You will have to make smarter decisions, hopefully based on data, wisdom from past experiences, and common sense.

You can choose to believe in your dreams. Your dreams help remind you that the present is temporary, and that the future will be better if you’re actively working toward your goals. Big dreams can be scary. Looking at them can be overwhelming. Believing in them can be intimidating. Those are the dreams that are worth it and help make life worth living.


Life is beautiful, but will always be challenging. We can get better at figuring it out over time, but there is only so much we do have control over and a lot that we don’t have any control over. A key thing to remember is that we do have some control in life; it’s our thoughts, decisions, and actions. No matter what life throws at us, we can think, decide, and act accordingly in order to keep us on the path towards our dreams.

Roderick Conwi is a professional development coach and writes at NourishmentNotes.com about lifestyle development. He is also the author of The Procrastinator's Quick Guide To Getting It Done. To get powerful insights that enhance your day, join his free newsletter.

Why What You Have Will Always Be More Than What You Don't Have

Photo Credit: Fré Sonneveld / CC0 1.0
“If you look at what you have in life, you’ll always have more. If you look at what you don’t have in life, you’ll never have enough.” —Oprah Winfrey

I’m lucky. Right now, my kids are at the age where they don’t ask me for things every time we’re at any store. The only thing they really ask me is to go to Chuck E. Cheese once every few days. Other than that, they seem pretty happy with what they have.

When we’re at at any retail store, they want to go to the toy section. They check out the toys, even play with them for a little bit, but they don’t ask me to buy it for them. Thank goodness they don’t cry or throw a tantrum when they don’t get what they want, at least for now.

My kids aren’t inhuman; they do want things. They want to play all the time, especially if it’s bedtime. They want to play with the same toy at the same time (and that’s when my wife or I have to play referee). Sometimes they want to eat a certain food (blueberries or granola) that we don’t currently have at home. But overall, they’re satisfied with what they have.

It’s something I admire about childhood. I wonder if we all were like that when we were younger and at some point, we learned to be greedy and selfish to a certain extent as we got older.

I know too many adults who are bitter because they aren’t happy with their life. It’s a tragedy in so many ways. Maybe we need to somehow go back to our youthful innocence and just be happy with what’s right in front of us.

As adults nowadays, it’s easy to look at what we don’t have because of what’s thrown in front of our faces. We see commercials, ads on TV or on social media, and we see what other people have. It’s very easy to compare what we have to what other people have or what we don’t have, but a lot of it is unnecessary.

Within reason, it’s good to have what we don’t have. Our goals and dreams are based on what we want, where we want to be in life, and the people we want to be. Beyond that, it’s greedy to want everything and envious to want everything that we don’t have.

It’s impossible to have every single physical thing out there, every new gadget, technology toy, or new product. It is possible to appreciate what you do have, which is always more than what you don’t have.

Roderick Conwi is a professional development coach and writes at NourishmentNotes.com about lifestyle development. He is also the author of The Procrastinator's Quick Guide To Getting It Done. To get powerful insights that enhance your day, join his free newsletter.